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Student Research

There are three ways (in addition to the research practicum) how TRU student can become part of the research learning process under my supervision.

  • Register for the SOCW 4900 Directed Studies course in the winter academic term
  • Become a Research Coach for SOCW 2120 course in the winter academic term
  • Participate in the funded research apprenticeship (deadline September 20th each year)

Here is a brief description of each opportunity:

  • SOCW 4900 – Directed Studies (3 credit hours). This independent study course is designed to allow students the opportunity to investigate a specific issue within a field or topic in social work, such as gerontology, mental health, sexual assault, or corrections. Consultation with, and permission of, a faculty member, Chair and the Dean is required.  The topics I am offering for winter term are: Social Work Education and Practice in Africa; Social Work Education and Practice in Asia and the Pacific;  Social Work Education and Practice in Europe; Social Work Education and Practice in Latin America;  Social Work Education and Practice in North America and the Caribbean; Social Work Practice with Newcomers to Canada; Social Work Practice in African Canadian Diaspora; Social Work Practice in Ukrainian Canadian Diaspora; and Social Work Fields of Practice in Canada. For the SOCW 4900-Directed Studies course, students must maintain a GPA of B+ or better to take this course
  • Research Coach for SOCW 2120 Course: Are you interested in becoming research coach for SOCW 2120 Social Welfare in Canada course I am scheduled to teach in the winter term? Successful student Research Coaches awarded a $1,500 scholarship giving them the opportunity to help instructors design a research project for a first- or second-year class and then guide students as they plan, research, and then present their research projects via participation in the Undergraduate Research Conference. Students who have taken SOCW 3000 Canadian Social Policy course and published their op-eds and letters to the editors are highly encouraged to apply. Please fill the student part of the application form: https://www.tru.ca/__shared/assets/Research_Coach_Application44298.pdf
  • Research Apprenticeship
  • Please see below projects that I am currently working and looking for students/volunteers who need a research experience to become a research apprentice for the project. If you are interested please send me an e-mail to okondrashov@tru.ca

Title of the Project: Schools of Social Work around the World. 1

Title of the Project: “Welcome to Kamloops” Newcomer Ambassador Program. 2

Title of the Project: The use of memoirs in teaching international social work: Each story counts. 3

Title of the Project: The use of memoirs in teaching Canadian social work: Each story counts. 4

 

Title of the Project: Schools of Social Work around the World

Project Description:

Asset mapping is a tool widely used in community development to promote sustainability and find new ways to connect people. The tool helps communities to identify their individual, associational, institutional, economic, physical, and cultural assets (Hardcastle, Powers, & Wenocur, 2011; Kretzmann, & McKnight, 1993; Lightfoot, McCleary, & Lum, 2014). The purpose of the project is to use the map of The Schools of Social Work Around the World developed by Dr. Oleksandr Kondrashov and create information sheets on the development of global social work education. The long-term goal of the project is to have one asset map and information sheet on social work education in every country of the globe.  Currently, the information sheets are available for the following countries: Ukraine, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and Switzerland (please click on hyperlinks to see the completed information sheets of Schools of Social Work in selected countries).

The Schools of Social Work Around the World asset map and information sheets can assist social work students and educators who work internationally or are looking to find Schools of Social Work in other countries to locate information about social work programs around the world in one online accessible location. The use of Schools of Social Work around the World asset map and information sheets has a potential to build partnerships and collaborations among universities that offer social work degrees and provide needed data on current state of development of social work education around the world.

Hardcastle, D. A., Powers, P. R., & Wenocur, S. (2011). Community practice: Theories and skills for social workers. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press

Kretzmann, J., & McKnight, J. (1993). Building communities from the inside out A path toward finding and mobilizing a community’s assets. Evanston, IL: Institute for Policy Research

Lightfoot, E., McCleary, J. S., & Lum, T. (2014). Asset mapping as a research tool for community-based participatory research in social work. Social Work Research, 38(1), 59-64.

Apprentice Role in the Project:

To support Dr. Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov in completing information sheets on the development of social work education in selected countries.

To add new schools of social work to the Schools of Social Work Around the World asset map

Apprentice Learning Experience:

The strengthened skill of asset mapping and its application in community work

Enhanced literature search techniques on finding academic sources for the development of social work in selected countries

Increased knowledge of social work education in selected countries

Faculty Experience in Supervising and Mentoring of Students:

Dr. Kondrashov has 13 years of teaching experience in multiple academic settings. More than 4500 undergraduate and graduate students have been supervised and completed more than 150-course offerings in four Universities across Canada: Dalhousie University, University of Northern British Columbia, University of Manitoba and Thompson Rivers University.

Dr. Kondrashov supervised seven independent studies courses (undergraduate and graduate) to support student’s projects in an academic setting.

Dr. Kondrashov provided liaison to more than 90 student’s practicums as a faculty advisor in field settings across Canada.

For more information on Dr. Kondrashov supervising and mentoring students experience, please visit the personal website: https://krasun.ca/teaching/

Title of the Project: “Welcome to Kamloops” Newcomer Ambassador Program.

Project Description:

“Welcome to Kamloops” Newcomer Ambassador Program is a new initiative that is based on the success of “Welcome to Kamloops” course. The course was offered through the Faculty of Education and Social Work in Kamloops community during 2017 and 2018 academic year for newcomers to provide essential information for successful adaption for life in Canada.  All the data collected from the Welcome to Kamloops course is available online: https://krasun.ca/welcome-to-kamloops/

The Newcomer Ambassador Program is a one month program that uses “train the trainer” approach  (Przymus, 2016) to educate future newcomer ambassadors in different communities around Kamloops, BC, and Canada. Students who complete the program will develop a resource guide for their community that will be available online and help newcomers integrate into local communities.

Przymus, S. D. (2016). Imagining and moving beyond the ESL bubble: Facilitating communities of practice through the ELL Ambassadors program. Journal of Language, Identity & Education15(5), 265-279.

Apprentice Role in the Project:

To attend Dr. Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov’s Newcomer Ambassador Program offered in November 2018 and then complete a research project on creating a resource guide for the local community in BC that model the Welcome to Kamloops resource guide.

To make the guide available online

To become a local newcomer ambassador

Apprentice Learning Experience:

The strengthened knowledge about local community resources to support newcomer’s adaptation

Enhanced literature search techniques for finding relevant sources to support newcomer adaptation in selected local community

Faculty Experience in Supervising and Mentoring of Students:

Dr. Kondrashov has 13 years of teaching experience in multiple academic settings. More than 4500 undergraduate and graduate students have been supervised and completed more than 150-course offerings in four Universities across Canada: Dalhousie University, University of Northern British Columbia, University of Manitoba and Thompson Rivers University.

Dr. Kondrashov supervised seven independent studies courses (undergraduate and graduate) to support student’s projects in an academic setting.

Dr. Kondrashov provided liaison to more than 90 student’s practicums as a faculty advisor in field settings across Canada.

For more information on Dr. Kondrashov supervising and mentoring students experience, please visit the personal website: https://krasun.ca/teaching/

Title of the Project: The use of memoirs in teaching international social work: Each story counts.

Project Description:

Social work educators are continually looking for new ways to make classroom learning more inclusive of diverse areas of social work practice. Memoirs have been successfully utilized in educating teachers to strengthen their reflection skills. (Braun, & Crumpler, 2004). The use of personal stories in social work education is also becoming more prevalent in designing and evaluating course assignments to promote reflective and often transformational learning experiences for students (Anderson, 2017; Balen, Rhodes, & Ward, 2010; Bolin, & Fog, 2006).

The research project aims to create a database of memoirs in teaching international social work course to demonstrate the scope of the field and to find new solutions in evolving societies to address displacement, forced migration, and belonging /exclusion. The compiled list of memoirs that was developed with direct student input (please see https://krasun.ca/memoirs/ )  to address critical areas of international social work practice needs to be updated and categorized based on both geographic and practice areas of international social work practice.  After each memoir is adequately classified, the research article will be published on what memoirs are available to teach selected practice topics in international social work.

Anderson, K. M. (2017). Let’s get personal: Digital stories for transformational learning in social work students. In Digital Storytelling in Higher Education (pp. 73-89). Springer International Publishing.

Balen, R., Rhodes, C., & Ward, L. (2010). The power of stories: Using narrative for interdisciplinary learning in health and social care. Social Work Education, 29(4), 416-426.

Bolin, A., & Fog, E. (2006). Stories in social work: An educational resource for evidence of practice learning. Journal of practice teaching in health and social work, 7(3), 22-42.

Braun Jr, J. A., & Crumpler, T. P. (2004). The social memoir: An analysis of developing reflective ability in a pre-service methods course. Teaching and Teacher Education20(1), 59-75.

Apprentice Role in the Project:

To update Dr. Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov’s memoir list (see https://krasun.ca/memoirs/ )with new memoirs relevant to international social work.

To categorize memoirs according to geographical location and areas of international social work practice

To facilitate the publication of academic article related to the use of memoirs in teaching international social work courses in Canada.

Apprentice Learning Experience:

The strengthened knowledge about available memoirs on topics related to multiple areas of international social work practice

Enhanced literature search techniques for finding relevant memoirs for international social work

Experience in co-publishing the article in an academic journal

Faculty Experience in Supervising and Mentoring of Students:

Dr. Kondrashov has 13 years of teaching experience in multiple academic settings. More than 4500 undergraduate and graduate students have been supervised and completed more than 150-course offerings in four Universities across Canada: Dalhousie University, University of Northern British Columbia, University of Manitoba and Thompson Rivers University.

Dr. Kondrashov supervised seven independent studies courses (undergraduate and graduate) to support student’s projects in an academic setting.

Dr. Kondrashov provided liaison to more than 90 student’s practicums as a faculty advisor in field settings across Canada.

For more information on Dr. Kondrashov supervising and mentoring students experience, please visit the personal website: https://krasun.ca/teaching/

Title of the Project: The use of memoirs in teaching Canadian social work: Each story counts.

Project Description:

Social work educators are continually looking for new ways to make classroom learning more inclusive of diverse areas of social work practice. Memoirs have been successfully utilized in educating teachers to strengthen their reflection skills. (Braun, & Crumpler, 2004). The use of personal stories in social work education is also becoming more prevalent in designing and evaluating course assignments to promote reflective and often transformational learning experiences for students (Anderson, 2017; Balen, Rhodes, & Ward, 2010; Bolin, & Fog, 2006).

The research project aims to create a database of memoirs in teaching social work practice courses in Canada. The compiled list of memoirs will be similar to the list developed by Dr. Kondrashov for teaching international social work (please see https://krasun.ca/memoirs/ )  to address critical areas of social work practice in Canada. The list will be categorized based on the practice areas of social work in Canada.  After each memoir is adequately classified, the research article will be published on what memoirs are available to teach selected practice topics in Canadian social work.

Anderson, K. M. (2017). Let’s get personal: Digital stories for transformational learning in social work students. In Digital Storytelling in Higher Education (pp. 73-89). Springer International Publishing.

Balen, R., Rhodes, C., & Ward, L. (2010). The power of stories: Using narrative for interdisciplinary learning in health and social care. Social Work Education, 29(4), 416-426.

Bolin, A., & Fog, E. (2006). Stories in social work: An educational resource for evidence of practice learning. Journal of practice teaching in health and social work, 7(3), 22-42.

Braun Jr, J. A., & Crumpler, T. P. (2004). The social memoir: An analysis of developing reflective ability in a pre-service methods course. Teaching and Teacher Education20(1), 59-75.

Apprentice Role in the Project:

To create a list of memoirs for teaching social work practice courses in Canada which is similar to the Dr. Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov’s memoir list (see https://krasun.ca/memoirs/ ).

To categorize memoirs according to areas of social work practice in Canada.

To facilitate the publication of academic article related to the use of memoirs in teaching social work practice courses in Canada.

Apprentice Learning Experience:

The strengthened knowledge about available memoirs on topics related to multiple areas of social work practice in Canada

Enhanced literature search techniques for finding relevant memoirs for social work practice in Canada

Experience in co-publishing the article in an academic journal

Faculty Experience in Supervising and Mentoring of Students:

Dr. Kondrashov has 13 years of teaching experience in multiple academic settings. More than 4500 undergraduate and graduate students have been supervised and completed more than 150-course offerings in four Universities across Canada: Dalhousie University, University of Northern British Columbia, University of Manitoba and Thompson Rivers University.

Dr. Kondrashov supervised seven independent studies courses (undergraduate and graduate) to support student’s projects in an academic setting.

Dr. Kondrashov provided liaison to more than 90 student’s practicums as a faculty advisor in field settings across Canada.

For more information on Dr. Kondrashov supervising and mentoring students experience, please visit the personal website: https://krasun.ca/teaching/

 

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