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Monthly Archives: April 2021

How Social Workers Use Podcast? Find out at #EMPRSocialWork Virtual Chat on May 1st at 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

On Saturday May 1st at 11:00 a.m. PT social workers will share their stories on using podcast to inspire virtual chat attendees to explore the power of voice in promoting social work policy, advocacy, education and research. Please register on Zoom https://bit.ly/31Qjf5n to watch live presentations, ask podcast creators questions and learn about the power of podcasting

During the virtual chat we will hear stories from:

#socialworkersrisehttps://www.socialworkersrise.com/podcast

#socialworkbubhttps://thesocialworkbubble.buzzsprout.com/

#Atypicalsocialworkerhttps://linktr.ee/Atypicalsocialworker

#socialworkroutespodcasthttps://open.spotify.com/show/6BYSYBXvsfPkldPRqPjhoe

#ebony_jaehttps://www.enduringthecourseinc.org/podcast

Thank you for your willingness to share the social work power of Social Work Podcasting with us

We also want to thank the organizing committee for helping promote our virtual chat:

Ani Dingamtar, MSW(c) University of Calgary

Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov, PhD Thompson Rivers University

If you want to share your podcast creation story please contact empowersocialworker@gmail.com

See you on Zoom on May 1, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. PT

Link for registration: https://bit.ly/31Qjf5n 

2,5 Year Virtual Chat: Event Agenda

11:00 a.m. -12:45 a.m. Pacific Time

1. Welcome: Land Acknowledgements (5 minutes)

  • Three questions in the chat: 1) Geographic location and Indigenous land; 2) How did you hear about this event; 3) Your interest in the event, hopes to learn from this event:

2. Organizers Welcome Words (1 minute each):

  • Ani Dingamtar, Woods Homes, Calgary, Canada. Thompson Rivers University BSW Alumni
  • Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov, Thompson Rivers University, School of Social Work and Human Service, Kamloops, Canada

3. Ani and Sasha introduction: #EMPRSOCIALWORK (3 minutes Ani)

  • EMPRSocialWork came out of Sasha and Ani’s discussion on tools for empowerment and practice in the human service field. Instagram, connection with people, and stories of people practicing social work.

4. Introduce Topic: Strengthening Social Work Practice, Policy, Advocacy, Research and Education: The Power of Expression in Podcast (2 minutes Sasha)

5. Speakers: Five-minute presentation (30 – 45 minutes)

6. Questions for the speakers Sasha will moderate? (15 minutes)

7. Discussion Questions: Chat with Zoom participants (15 minutes): How can we keep supporting each other going forward? How can we keep in contact by supporting and empowering one another? What type of events can we do together in the future? Who and how can you get engaged in social work social media?

8. Next steps: (5 minutes)  Action plan from the discussion.  

9. Concluding Messages: Chat. 5 minutes. Thank you to organizers and speakers and another event in (six months?) or organizing small #EMPRSocialWork conference. More information to come.

Ukrainians in Canada: An Introduction. A New Self-Paced Course is Now Available Online

Dr. Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov

A self-paced course on Ukrainians in Canada: An introduction become possible as part of Thompson Rivers University (TRU) – Bohdan Khmelnytskyi National University (BKNU) Partnership. Community members worldwide were able to join students and faculty from BKNU and TRU and learn about the 130th years’ history of Ukrainian immigration to Canada.

This community learning course from January-April 2021 was an opportunity to celebrate the life of Ukrainian People in Canada. TRU and BKNU recently signed a memorandum of understanding to promote research and teaching among universities. The Ukrainians in Canada: An Introduction was the first in a series of Ukrainian Diaspora Studies courses offered to Ukrainian-Canadian community members free of charge as part of the Dr. Oleksandr (Sasha) Kondrashov gift of learning. One TRU social work student completed a practicum requirement supporting Dr. Kondrashov in the winter term offering of the course. Five participants from Ukraine (three from BKNU) attended all the classes, with 15 participants from Canada and one from the US. More than 80 participants registered for the class received weekly lecture notes and learned through the hy-flex course delivery format.

The course created a space to collect resources and celebrate Ukrainian-Canadians’ lives in the last 130 years. We heard stories about multiple forms of oppression that people of Ukraine experience in Ukraine and Canada and how they overcome challenges and build communities across Canada to strengthen their Ukrainian-Canadian identities. The course was a celebration of stories from Ukrainians in Canada from all waves of immigration.

The course is now fully available online. Please watch the introduction video on how to participate in the self-paced course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIRLSpxy0aM

You can download all slides (310 ) as a 31-page handout to go through 200 learning activities or check each lecture in pdf format by clicking on individual links

  • Unit 0 Ukrainians in Canada: Course Design
  • Unit 1 Waves of Ukrainian immigration to Canada over 125+ years: Socio-Economic and Socio-Cultural Integration
  • Unit 2 Push Factors: History of Ukraine and factors that influence the decision to immigrate to Canada
  • Unit 3 Pull Factors: History of Canada and its immigration policy to attract immigrants 
  • Unit 4 Prominent Ukrainian Canadians
  • Unit 5 First Wave of Ukrainian Immigration to Canada: Socio-Economic and Socio-Cultural Experiences (1896-1917)
  • Unit 6 Second Wave of Ukrainian Immigration to Canada: Socio-Economic and Socio-Cultural Experiences (1918-1940)
  • Unit 7 Third Wave of Ukrainian Immigration to Canada: Socio-Economic and Socio-Cultural Experiences 1: DP and UCC (1941-1960)
  • Unit 8 Third Wave of Ukrainian Immigration to Canada: Socio-Economic and Socio-Cultural Experiences 2: Multiculturalism (1961-1990)
  • Unit 9 Fourth, Fifth and Sixth? Waves of Ukrainian Immigration to Canada: Socio-Economic and Socio-Cultural Experiences: (1991-present)
  • Unit 10 Ukrainian-Canadian Folklore: Literature and Language Across Waves of Immigration
  • Unit 11 Ukrainian-Canadian Concerns: Selected by Class Participants
  • Unit 12 The future of Ukrainian Canadian Diaspora: Course Review

Thank you to everyone who registered for the winter 2021 offering of the course and all who attended our classes. You made this course very special and started the Ukrainian Diaspora Studies learning. The two new courses that will be offered in summer 2021 on Ukrainian Canadian Cuisine and Ukrainian Diaspora outside of Canada will continue the community learning tradition and allow more Ukrainian-Canadian members to learn and celebrate Ukrainian-Canadian Diaspora. More information about new courses and how to register can be found online https://krasun.ca/history-of-ukrainians-in-canada/

TRU Social Work Students Enhance Accessibility of the Mental Wellness Supports in Thompson Okanagan

Kayla Rosette & Maddison Harris

Mental Wellness Thompson Okanagan is a website developed by two third year practicum students in the Bachelor of Social Work at TRU. We identified a gap in resources and knowledge within mental wellness and worked to fill that gap by creating this one stop shop website. In this process we wanted to create our own animated videos to educate and engage users of all ages. We included topics of burnout, depression, anxiety, loneliness, stress, connection/disconnection, and self-care, the videos also included myths and tips for how to manage these issues from home. Under each of these topics, we have additional resources (YouTube videos, podcasts, TedTalks… etc.) as well to bring in different forms of learning and ways of explaining the concepts. 

The videos were our first main staple, for our second one we really wanted to bridge together information with local resources. Our focus was the entire region of the Thompson Okanagan, grouping the smaller areas that are in close proximity together in the hope that people from those smaller communities don’t have to visit multiple pages to find a resource. 

The reason why we are calling this a “one stop shop” is that people may watch the videos, look at the additional resources and then if they want or need to, they can look their community up in our drop down page, read about each resource (we included counselling offices, social work organizations and social services) in order to make an informed decision on where they’re connecting with, without having to do the full research process. 

We included two additional sections as well; mental health mobile apps and 24/7 helplines. The purpose of the app section was so people may access assistance without having to have a face to face or over the phone interaction. From personal experience, working directly with someone can cause more anxiety and we wanted to give our users as many options as possible to ensure they could feel safe while receiving assistance. The 24/7 helplines are non-emergency but provide users a chance to talk to someone if they feel uneasy or uncomfortable talking with a family member or friend. 

We encourage you to check our website out and hope you share it around!:)

Mentallwellnessthompsonokanagan.com